Linguistics

2014-15 Tuition

$29,500

Application deadlines

Fall, Jan. 15; no spring admission

Requirements summary

  • all Graduate School Requirements, including the TOEFL Exam for Non-Native English Applicants
  • three recommendations
  • GRE general test
  • Internet-based Test (iBT) minimum scores for admissions: Writing: 20, Listening: 15, Reading: 20, Speaking: 22
  • research paper

Degrees

  • Ph.D.

Subjects

  • Linguistics (Ph.D.)

Major concentrations

  • general linguistics

Minor concentrations

  • computational linguistics
  • East Asian linguistics
  • English linguistics
  • Germanic linguistics
  • Indo-European linguistics
  • phonetics
  • phonological theory
  • second language acquisition
  • semantics
  • Slavic linguistics
  • Southeast Asian linguistics
  • syntactic theory

The interests of the faculty cover a wide range of areas in theoretical linguistics. The field's graduate program covers all facets of linguistics, as well as an exceptionally broad spectrum of course dealing with the history and structure of particular languages. All graduate students in the field are enrolled in the Ph.D. program.

A regular course load for students without a teaching appointment is four courses per semester. Students who are teaching normally take three courses per semester. All linguistics courses should be taken under the letter-grade option.

Ph.D. program. To assure that Ph.D. students receive an adequate grounding in all of the fundamental areas of linguistics, the field has defined a "core" requirement in the areas of Syntax, Phonology, Semantics, and Historical Linguistics. In addition, Ph.D. students are expected to take one course from the following subfields: computational linguistics, historical linguistics (beyond 3314), morphology, phonetics, and pragmatics. Ph.D. students must also participate in the Research Workshop in conjunction with another workshop (no seminars) or independent study during the fall semester of their third year.

Application:
Admission is for fall only. All applicants are required to submit GRE general test scores. Non-native English speaking applicants must also submit TOEFL Internet-based Test (iBT) minimum scores for admissions: Writing: 20, Listening: 15, Reading: 20, Speaking: 22.

Dorit Abusch -- Concentrations: general linguistics; semantics; Research interests: semantics of natural language and the syntax-semantics interface
John Bowers -- Concentrations: general linguistics; semantics; syntactic theory; English linguistics; Research interests: syntactic theory
Wayles Browne -- Concentrations: general linguistics; phonological theory; Slavic linguistics; syntactic theory; Research interests: Slavic linguistics
Abigail Cohn -- Concentrations: general linguistics; phonetics; phonological theory; Southeast Asian linguistics; Research interests: phonology; phonetics-phonology interface; Indonesian linguistics
Miloje Despic -- Concentrations: general linguistics; Slavic linguistics; syntactic theory; Research interests: Syntax, Morphology, Interfaces, Sociolinguistics, Language and Gender.
Molly Diesing -- Concentrations: general linguistics; semantics; syntactic theory; Germanic linguistics; Research interests: syntactic theory; semantics; Germanic linguistics
John Hale -- Concentrations: general linguistics; computational linguistics; Research interests: general linguistics; computational linguistics; cognitive modeling; psycholinguistics
Wayne Harbert -- Concentrations: general linguistics; syntactic theory; English linguistics; Germanic linguistics; Research interests: German and Celtic linguistics; syntactic theory
Barbara Lust -- Concentrations: general linguistics; second language acquisition; Research interests: language development; cognitive development
Sarah Murray -- Concentrations: general linguistics; semantics; Research interests: semantics and pragmatics of natural language; cognitive science; philosophy of language; Cheyenne
Alan Nussbaum -- Concentrations: general linguistics; Indo-European linguistics; Research interests: Indo-European linguistics; Greek and Latin language and linguistics; Homer; Old Latin
Mats Rooth -- Concentrations: general linguistics; semantics; computational linguistics; Research interests: computational linguistics; semantics
Samuel Tilsen -- Concentrations: general linguistics; phonetics; phonological theory; Research interests: Cognitive neuro science; dynamical systems
Michael Weiss -- Concentrations: general linguistics; Indo-European linguistics; Research interests: Indo-European linguistics; historical linguistics
John Whitman -- Concentrations: general linguistics; syntactic theory; East Asian linguistics; Research interests: syntactic theory; East Asian linguistics
Draga Zec -- Concentrations: general linguistics; phonetics; phonological theory; Slavic linguistics; Research interests: phonology; phonology-syntax interface; Slavic linguistics

Graduate School Professors (emeritus)

Carol Rosen -- Concentrations: general linguistics; syntactic theory; Research interests: syntactic theory; Romance linguistics
John Wolff -- Concentrations: general linguistics; Southeast Asian linguistics; Research interests:

Linguistics Learning Objectives

Students completing a Ph.D. in Linguistics should be able to:

  • Produce original, publishable research in the field, demonstrate independent thinking to find topics of inquiry, linguistic data, and develop concepts and methods.
  • Demonstrate a thorough command of theoretical and empirical knowledge across several distinct subareas of the field of linguistics, such as phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, computational or historical linguistics. 
  • Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of a major area of expertise in linguistics, including a thorough knowledge of the relevant literature.
  • Show effective mastery of the appropriate methodologies and techniques necessary for research, such as statistics, computational skills, formal logic, acoustic and articulatory methodologies, and data documentation methods.
  • Show effective professional skills:  keeping abreast of advances within the field, clear and concise writing, well-organized presentations in conference and classroom settings, well-conceived course syllabi, job search preparation.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to advancing the values of scholarship: teaching and mentoring,  adhere to ethical standards of the discipline, engagement in professional societies (CLC, LSA), editorial activities.

Learn more about the assessment plan and measures for the graduate field of linguistics.