Communication

2014-15 Tuition

$20,800

Application deadlines

Fall, Jan. 1; no spring admission

Requirements summary

  • all Graduate School Requirements, including the TOEFL Exam for Non-Native English Applicants
  • statement of purpose (online application submission preferred)
  • official transcripts
  • a writing sample (online application submission preferred)
  • three recommendations (online application submission preferred)
  • GRE general test
  • TOEFL minimum score of 100 (internet-based), 250 (computer-based), or 600 (paper-based)

 

This field is accepting only applications for the M.S./Ph.D. and Ph.D. programs for 2010 admissions.

Degrees

  • Ph.D.

Subjects

  • Communication (Ph.D.)

Major concentrations

  • communication
  • human-computer interaction
  • language and communication
  • media communication and society
  • organizational communication
  • science, environment and health communication
  • social psychology communication

The Cornell University graduate program in Communication is designed to assist students in proposing, testing, and refining communication theories; in practicing skilled research; and in becoming knowledgeable about communication.

The Ph.D. degree is a research degree. Cornell's doctoral program is designed to be a small, high quality program that will encourage students' interests in academic work and will prepare them for nonacademic job opportunities.  Doctoral students focus on developing communication theory based on empirical social science research.  Program graduates will be able to compete successfully for teaching and research positions at colleges and universities, work at consulting firms, or conduct research and contribute to policy in government and private organizations.

Applicants must submit recent GRE general test scores and are expected to have some competence in at least one area of communication or to be willing to spend time beyond the normal degree requirements to gain competence. Persons with experience in communication are encouraged to apply; evidence of superior performance in the professional field will be considered in combination with academic records and GRE scores. A minimum TOEFL score of 100 (internet-based), 250 (computer-based), or 600 (paper-based) is required.

Rosemary Avery -- Concentrations: science, environment and health communication; Research interests: impact of advertising on health-related behavior
Natalie Bazarova -- Concentrations: communication; social psychology communication; Research interests: interpersonal, small group and computer-mediated research
Sahara Byrne -- Concentrations: social psychology communication; media communication and society; science, environment and health communication; Research interests: cognitive development and media effects; persuasion and the boomerang effect
Dan Cosley -- Concentrations: human-computer interaction; Research interests: online communities; recommender systems; human-computer interaction
Melissa Ferguson -- Concentrations: communication; Research interests: social cognition; automaticity of ideology; the role of affect in judgment and decision-making
Susan Fussell -- Concentrations: social psychology communication; human-computer interaction; Research interests: human-computer interaction; social psychology communication; computer-mediated communication; computer-supported collaborative work; intercultural communication; social computing
Geraldine Gay -- Concentrations: communication; media communication and society; Research interests: cognitive and social issues for the design of interactive communication technologies
Tarleton Gillespie -- Concentrations: media communication and society; Research interests: digital copyright; technology and cultural participation; critical discourse of technology; new media and society; commercialization of digital media
Jeffrey Hancock -- Concentrations: social psychology communication; media communication and society; Research interests: computer mediated communication; human-computer interaction; psychology of language; social interaction online; deception
Stephen Hilgartner -- Concentrations: communication; science, environment and health communication; Research interests: science, technology and media; risk; the flow of knowledge
Lee Humphreys -- Concentrations: media communication and society; human-computer interaction; Research interests: human-computer interaction; media communication and society; social uses and effects of communication technology; new media and society; mobile communication; urban communication
Steven Jackson -- Concentrations: media communication and society; science, environment and health communication; Research interests: communication policy; scientific communication collaboration; science and technology studies
Malte Jung -- Concentrations: communication; human-computer interaction; Research interests: communication; human-computer interaction
Bruce Lewenstein -- Concentrations: communication; science, environment and health communication; Research interests: history and evaluation of public communication of science and technology; models of science communication; documentation and history of contemporary science
Michael Macy -- Concentrations: communication; social psychology communication; media communication and society; Research interests: collective action; emergence of norms; networks and cascades; game theory; agent-based modeling; social phsychology
Drew Margolin -- Concentrations: communication; media communication and society; organizational communication; Research interests: communication; language and communication; media communication and society; organizational communication
Alan Mathios -- Concentrations: social psychology communication; Research interests: consumer protection; antitrust law and economics; public utility regulation; federal and state regulation
Katherine McComas -- Concentrations: science, environment and health communication; Research interests: risk communication; community involvement; public participation
Poppy L. McLeod -- Concentrations: social psychology communication; media communication and society; Research interests: communication in small groups; interagency coordination in social services
Jeff Niederdeppe -- Concentrations: media communication and society; science, environment and health communication; Research interests: science, environment and health communication; media communication and society; mass communication; media campaigns; persuasive message design
Clifford Scherer -- Concentrations: communication; media communication and society; science, environment and health communication; Research interests: communication of scientific and technical information; impact of new communication technologies
Dawn Schrader -- Concentrations: communication; Research interests: moral psychology; ethics; lifespan developmental psychology; privacy and technology; cognitive psychology
Jonathon Schuldt -- Concentrations: social psychology communication; science, environment and health communication; Research interests: science, environment and health communication; message framing; food labeling; social cognition
Michael Shapiro -- Concentrations: communication; social psychology communication; media communication and society; Research interests: mental processing of media; processing of media and new technology narratives; narrative impact on beliefs, attitudes and behaviors
Alex Susskind -- Concentrations: social psychology communication; Research interests: organizational change and development; communication technology and business processes
Connie Yuan -- Concentrations: communication; media communication and society; Research interests: social network; knowledge management; communications technologies

Graduate School Professors (emeritus)

Royal Colle -- Concentrations: Research interests: communication and community development, with a heavy emphasis on developing nations

Field of Communication Learning Objectives

Students completing a Ph.D. in Communication should be able to:

Make an original and substantial contribution to the field, advance communication theory, think originally and independently, and identify new research opportunities within the field.

Measures:

  1. Dissertation Proposal.  Evaluation: committee approval via rubric
  2. Dissertation. Evaluation: committee approval via rubric
  3. Peer-reviewed Publications. Evaluation: bi-annual CV review by field faculty
  4. Fellowships/grant applications submitted.  Evaluation: bi-annual CV review, field records
    Demonstrate advanced research skills via critical evaluation of one’s own findings and those of others; synthesizing existing knowledge; identifying and accessing appropriate resources.

   Measures:

  1. Second-Year Research Project. Evaluation: committee approval via rubric
  2. A-exam. Evaluation: committee approval via rubric
  3. Student Course Performance. Evaluation: course grades
  4. Student Presentation Skills (in local colloquia and at conferences). Evaluation: structured observations
  5. Student Writing Skills. Evaluation: advisor and instructor assessment of writing skills
    Demonstrate commitment to advancing the values of scholarship by keeping abreast of advances within one’s field and related areas, showing commitment to professional development via professional societies, publication and knowledge transfer; and supporting learning via teaching, mentoring and demonstration

Measures:

  1. A-exam. Evaluation: committee approval via rubric.
  2. Peer-reviewed publication. Evaluation: bi-annual CV review by field faculty.
  3. Conference and colloquium participation. Evaluation: bi-annual CV review by field faculty.
  4. Participation in professional development activities. Evaluation: bi-annual CV review by field faculty, field records.
  5. Teaching Assistantship Performance. Evaluation: TA evaluation data.
  6. Supervising Undergraduate RAs or TAs. Evaluation: supervisor observation, RA/TA feedback.
    Demonstrate professional skills by adhering to ethical standards in the discipline, and by listening to, giving and receiving feedback effectively.

Measures:

  1. Academic Integrity Infractions. Evaluation: field and graduate school records.
  2. Adherence to relevant research compliances. Evaluation: IRB, field and advisor records.
  3. Participation in Ethics Courses or Training. Evaluation: IRB and field records.
  4. Student receptivity to criticism of academic work. Evaluation: Committee observation.