Architecture

2014-15 Tuition

Research degree: $29,500; professional degree: $47,050

Application deadlines

Fall, Jan. 3; no spring admission

Requirements summary

For M.Arch requirements please see http://aap.cornell.edu/academics/architecture/graduate/march

For all other Architecture degree please see requirements below.

  • all Graduate School Requirements, including the TOEFL Exam for Non-Native English Applicants
  • Two recommendations
  • Transcripts: Submit completed and official transcripts from each college or university previously attended to the field to which you are applying. If it is against an institution's policy to send transcripts to the applicant, the transcripts can be mailed by the school directly to the field to which you are applying.
  • GRE general test for all
  • GRE subject test in computer science for computer graphics applicants
  • Portfolio of creative work (Post-Professional M.Arch applicants only)
  • TOEFL Exam for Non-Native English Applicants. Minimum score of 250 computer-based or 600 paper-based.
  • Statement of purpose (A one- or two-page statement, preferably printed on white paper, outlining your research interests and intents for graduate study at Cornell. Please relate these intents to your previous design and academic experience, and to your future goals. Include your full name and your proposed field of study at the top of each page.)

Note on Professional Accreditation
In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted an eight-year, three-year or two-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards. Master's degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The NAAB grants candidacy status to new programs that have developed viable plans for achieving initial accreditation. Candidacy status indicates that a program should be accredited within 6 years of achieving candidacy, if its plan is properly implemented.

Degrees

  • M.Arch. post-professional
  • M.S.
  • Ph.D.

Subjects

  • Architectural Science (M.S.)
  • Design (M.Arch. post-professional)
  • History of Architecture and Urban Development (Ph.D.)

Major concentrations

  • architectural design
  • computer graphics
  • history of architecture
  • history of urban development
  • urban design

Minor concentrations

  • building technology and environmental science
  • theory and criticism of architecture

Architectural science (M.S.). Students with an undergraduate degree in architecture, architectural engineering, engineering, or computer science are likely candidates for the graduate program in architectural science. Program objectives are (1) to afford an opportunity for students of architecture to expand their creative design potential by increasing their knowledge and understanding of environmental science and building technologies and (2) to provide a framework within which students who have graduated from other technical disciplines may explore computer science, computer graphics, and computer-aided design methods. Students enrolling for studies in computer graphics use the facilities of the interdisciplinary Program of Computer Graphics.

Ordinarily four terms of residence are required to complete the program of study, depending on the student's background and experience.

Architecture (M.Arch. professional) the professional Master of Architecture program (M.Arch.1) is a three-and-a-half-year course of study dedicated to preparing graduate students from diverse disciplines and backgrounds for careers in architecture. The program builds on the excellence and distinction of Cornell’s renowned B.Arch. degree, but is specifically crafted to engage the unique strengths and needs of the graduate student. Committed to the view that the question of appropriate practice must be continually investigated and reassessed in today’s globally expansive and technologically dynamic context, the program places this question at the center of the learning process, seeking to empower the student’s sense of inquiry, responsibility and creativity. Teaching in the program complements basic skills and knowledge essential to the profession with engagement in emergent social, cultural, technical and environmental concerns that characterize architecture’s expanded field in the 21st century.
 
The curriculum comprises a rich offering of courses in visual representation, history and theory of architecture, technology, and professional practice, complemented by six semesters of design studios. The design studio is the core of the curriculum, with the design project serving as a negotiating platform between diverse practices, technologies and fields of knowledge. The intensive course of study encourages the development of individual research trajectories at the upper levels, and culminates in a one-semester design thesis. Making full use of Cornell University's excellent resources across all disciplines, the M.Arch.1 situates itself globally, drawing upon distinguished national and international visitors, Cornell Architecture’s New York City studio, and traveling studio locations worldwide. The M.Arch.1 program is open to applicants possessing a four-year bachelor’s degree in any area.

Note on Professional Accreditation
In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: bachelor of architecture, master of architecture, and doctor of architecture. A program may be granted an eight-year, three-year or two-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Doctor of architecture and master of architecture degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

In order to meet the education requirement set forth by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, an applicant for an NCARB certificate must hold a professional degree in architecture from a program accredited by the NAAB; the degree must have been awarded not more than two years prior to initial accreditation.

AAP's M.Arch. (professional) program was formally granted an eight-year term accreditation effective 2013-2021.

Design (M.Arch. post-professional) Three-Semester Post-Professional M.Arch.2 Program 

Cornell's Post-professional Master of Architecture is an intensive advanced design research (ADR) program. Open to individuals holding a B.Arch. or an M.Arch 1 (first-professional) degree, the three-semester program beginning the first weekday in June offers a critical framework for investigating pertinent design concerns, practices, and technologies in 21st-century architecture and urbanism. A structure of advanced studios  and seminars allows students to pursue trajectories of inquiry within one of three interrelated territories of investigation(TI):  

Architecture & Urbanism (A/U): Urban Geography, Typological Studies, Urban Theory, Networks, Infrastructures, Urban Imaging, Ecological Urbanism 

Architecture & Ecology (A/E):  Sustainable practices, Soft Infrastructures, Materials Research, Machinic Prototypes, Extreme Structures 

Architecture & Discourse (A/D): Theory, Criticism, Publishing, Cultural Production, Design Research , History and Contemporaneity


History of architecture and urban development (M.A., Ph.D.). Applicants should have an undergraduate degree in architecture, archaeology, history, history of art, or anthropology, or appropriate experience in the field. Applicants may apply for the master's or doctoral programs in architectural history or urban development history. Applicants with previous graduate work can be considered for advanced standing. Master's degree candidates in the history of architecture or urban development programs are required to have reading proficiency in at least one modern language other than English; Ph.D. degree candidates must have proficiency in two languages other than English before beginning the second year of study.

This area offers many opportunities for enrichment through other educational institutions and public or nonprofit agencies. Cornell cooperates with Harvard University in the archaeological exploration of Sardis in Turkey. Students and faculty members often work with summer programs in architectural design, history of architecture, and landscape architecture offered by departments and graduate fields.

The field also offers a joint program with the Field of City and Regional Planning leading to the M.Arch. and M.R.P. degrees.

Application:
All applicants must submit GRE general test scores. Applicants to the computer graphics program must also submit scores on the GRE subject test in computer science. Applicants to the architecture (M.Arch. professional) and design programs must also submit a portfolio of visual materials.

International students whose undergraduate training has been completed outside the United States are admitted as provisional candidates. They should plan to spend at least four terms in residence for the master's degree. TOEFL minimum score of 600 (paper-based) or 250 (computer-based) .

Lily Chi -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; urban design; architectural design; history of architecture; history of urban development; Research interests: architectural design; theory and criticism; theories of architectural representation; history of architectural theory; seventeenth- and eighteenth-century France
Mark Cruvellier -- Concentrations: architectural design; Research interests: building technology and environmental science; architectural science and design; structures -- tall buildings, bridges; computer visualization of structural behavior
Jeremy Foster -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; architectural design; Research interests: architectural design; theory and criticism of architecture; landscape/architecture reciprocities; landscape design and urbanism; history and theory of landscape thinking; cultural geographies of place, identity and memory
Werner Goehner (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; urban design; architectural design; Research interests: architectural design; urban design; theory of architecture
Donald Greenberg -- Concentrations: computer graphics; Research interests: computer-aided architectural design; computer graphics; architectural structures; architectural technology
George Hascup (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: urban design; architectural design; Research interests: architectural design; urban design; visual studies; furniture design
Kent Hubbell (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: urban design; architectural design; Research interests: architectural design; urban design; building technology and environmental science
Kent Kleinman (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: urban design; architectural design; Research interests: architectural design
D. Lasansky -- Concentrations: history of architecture; history of urban development; Research interests: Northern Mediterranean architecture and urbanism; nineteenth- and twentieth-century architecture; relationship between popular culture and architecture
Aleksandr Mergold (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; urban design; architectural design; Research interests: Research interests are: re-cycling and re-purposing in design; vernacular architecture; history, theory and practice of representation.
Leonard Mirin (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: urban design; architectural design; Research interests: landscape architecture history and theory; landscape architectural design; Japanese landscape architecture
Mark Morris (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: urban design; architectural design; Research interests: architecture; history of architecture; architectural design; urban design and theory
Vincent Mulcahy (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; urban design; architectural design; Research interests: architectural design; urban design
Caroline O'Donnell (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; urban design; architectural design; Research interests: contemporary architecture; the relationship between architecture and its content; spatial perception
Jonathan Ochshorn (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: urban design; building technology and environmental science; architectural design; Research interests: architectural and urban design; building technology and environmental science; building construction and technology in relation to architectural design
Arthur Ovaska (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; urban design; architectural design; Research interests: architectural design
Sara Pritchard -- Concentrations: history of architecture; Research interests: history of technology; environmental history; modern France and French Empire
Henry Richardson (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; urban design; architectural design; computer graphics; Research interests: architectural and urban design; housing in developing countries; IT applications in architecture
Jenny Sabin (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: architectural design; Research interests: architectural design and emerging technologies; architecture and science; advanced materials and fabrication;design computation; ecological design and architectual science; visualization
Andrea Simitch (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: urban design; architectural design; Research interests: architectural design; urban design; visual studies
Val Warke (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; urban design; architectural design; Research interests: architectural design; theory of architecture; urban design
Jerry Wells (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; urban design; architectural design; Research interests: urban design; housing; building systems
James Williamson (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; urban design; architectural design; Research interests: architecture theory; architecture and representation; architecture and religious thought; architecture and the imagination
Mary Woods -- Concentrations: urban design; architectural design; history of architecture; history of urban development; Research interests: history of nineteenth-century European and American architecture and urbanism; photography; film and the built environment; history of the architectural profession
John Zissovici (Divisional) (Minor Member) -- Concentrations: theory and criticism of architecture; architectural design; Research interests: architecture and urban design; theory and criticism